Tag Archives: Edward Stegge

Diablo Ballet’s March 2 Program, Shadelands, Walnut Creek

9 Mar

Shadelands in Walnut Creek is a community facility with a makeshift stage where Diablo Ballet performs twice a year.  The company’s dancers have taught there and provide the city with outreach programs. There just may be a fiscal advantage over full season at the Dean Lesher Center downtown.

Neither venue is ideal for dance. Dean Lesher needs more front lighting.  Shadelands gives lousy sight lines for an audience member seated  behind someone  moving their head for their own viewing convenience.  The Diablo dancers rise above the limitations ,and in assignments in listed ballets project the skill and refinement defining the small ensemble since its inception eighteen years ago.  The level surpasses several larger professional ensembles, including  the beautiful lighting of Jack Carpenter.

This March  program displayed three women and four men in four works proceeding without pause, two initially mounted on Diablo Ballet, one a totally new work and Christopher Wheeldon’s pas de deux a West Coast premiere of the 2000 work Mercurial Maneuvers for New York City Ballet. Former S.F. Ballet principal Joanna Berman mounted Wheeldon’s work, occasioning two interviews.

Tina Kay Bohnstedt, now ballet mistress with Houston Ballet, created “First Movement from A Path of Delight or…” to Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 23 in A Major in 2009, inspiring a pas de quatre danced at various stage locations. Characterized by Bohnstedt’s particular penchant, an upper torso roll to the trills and arpeggios frequently appears with a forward thrust of one foot, shoulders back.  Bohnstedt also uses the device in lifts, contrasting to picky little bourrees with the dancers’ head concentrated on the floor in tricky passages.  Visually the patterns are quite different from the quiet clarity of the piano, but they also cohere to the music and were nicely performed.

David Fonnegra’s Back in The Day uses pop tunes for a pas de trois with Edward Stegge and Fonnegra lightly vying for Rosselyn  Ramirez’ favors. A completely predictable piece, with populist overtones, it was neatly danced with Ramirez gently personifying the why of the competition.

Hiromi Yamazaki and Derek Sakakura were neatly matched in the Wheeldon piece, a lovely essay in turning dancers’ back to the audience, lifts that displayed Yamazaki like a banner in the wind, and the choreographer’s amazing capacity to visualize the music, here Dmitri Shostakovitch’s Piano Concerto No. 1

K.T. Nelson’s 1997 work for the company, The Escaping Game, closed the program.  Utilizing the music of Zap Mama, I remember the work as using more dancers than the five featured. Nelson creates a cheeky form of bravura, part classic, part modern with a lively spread of corn pone.  Her imagination is in a class by itself.

Following the brief program a question and answer period followed.  Diablo Ballet will dance at the end of March at Hillbarn Theatre in Foster City, at San Jose State University and at Napa’s Opera House, giving the program and dancers a seven performance run. If  such runs become a company habit. it would be a welcome and deserved development.

Diablo Ballet Started its Eighteenth Season November 19

26 Nov

Starting its eighteenth season at Walnut Creek’s  Dean Lesher Center for the Arts, Diablo Ballet danced three performances of three ballets, two new to the repertoire, one a world premiere.  Seeing the November 19 matinee, I had mixed reactions to Le Spectre de la Rose, Tears From Above and Fluctuating Hemlines.

Val Caniparoli’s premiere was a pas de quatre for Tears from Above, danced to music for two cellos by Elena Kats-Chernin, a composer originally from deep in central Asia but now residing in Australia. As one might expect the hints of melancholy were strong, reflecting vast stretches of land with little deviation of lifestyle.  Danced by Mayo Sugano and new comers Hiromi Yamazaki, Derek Sakakura and Robert Dekkers, I want to see the piece a second time before venturing my response.

Of Spectre de la Rose, the reaction was easier, thanks to the music’s familiarity and the voluminous prose written regarding Fokine’s ballet and its phenomenal role for Vaslav Nijinsky.

The period difference from nineteenth to early twenty-first centuries could scarcely be stronger in this tale of love’s awakening dream as conceived by Dominic Walsh.  Domenico Luciano as Spectre had created the role in this adaption.  A handsomely-sculpted dancer, Luciano was garbed in a cluster of  rust- colored petals on his left chest over flesh-hued body suit and something obscuring his dark hair.  Rosalyn Ramirez, first seen in Diablo’s spring program, was dressed in a simple white sheath-like tunic with slits up the side.

Katy Heilein’s solution for the appearance of the Spectre was hanging white draperies for the Spectre’s appearing and vanishing. Both dancers, skilled performers, had to dance at times when the Spectre manipulated the Girl’s head or moved her abruptly in ways a young woman’s first romance isn’t  likely to be dreamed, unless prone to some degree of masochism. It was a bit as if  the Spectre was playing Lermontov in The Red Shoes. I found myself wincing, but the Spectre vanished in a whoosh of white curtain and I was relieved it was over.

Septime Weber’s “Fluctuating Hemlines” was revived from its fall, 2001 Diablo Ballet premiere, but was choreographed originally in 1995 for the American Repertory Ballet.  Weber, artistic director of the Washington Ballet, used exaggerated wigs and nearly Barbie Doll costumes for the four women and de rigeur jacket, ties, trousers and shirts for the men.  Weber utilized pantomime
to indicate the four girls were manifestations of prissiness.  The men were given gestures of compulsive awareness of time, checking their watches, adjusting ties, inspecting trousers for creases in the wrong places.

The coming together of male and female registered signals  of “no-no,” and “you mustn’t” in liberal dosages.  That is, until male and female attires were shed, trunks and body suits revealed and a good time was had by all;  although it seems the gestural traces of former behavior kept cropping up.  The idea was clever, but there’s so much one can do  before the lack of characterization begins to be felt.  One then desires more specificity, which Fluctuating Hemline sacrificed in the interest of generalities.  The cast comprised all the previously mentioned dancers in addition to Edward Stegge. David Fonnegra and Erika Johnson.

Diablo Ballet’s early spring season, March 2-3 will be danced at Shadelands Arts Center, Walnut Creek with an additional two performances March 30-31 at Foster City’s Hillbarn Theater.

May 4 and 5 will again see the company finish the season with three performances at Shadelands.

Diablo Ballet’s 2010-2011 Season’s Ending at Shadowlands

16 Jul

This talented eight dancer ensemble is completing its seventeenth season across the Bay from San Francisco.  It has provided a venue for chamber-sized works by K.T. Nelson of ODC/SF’s artistic staff, Val Caniparoli of S.F. Ballet, Christopher Stowell now heading Oregon Ballet Theater and its dancers eager to further their aesthetic exploration.  The company has enlisted the talents of Katherine Wells, an extraordinarily versatile dancer native to the Bay Area and
Tatyana Martyanova, tall and elegant, originally from Odessa via Les Grands Ballets Canadiens de Montreal and other companies.

For this season’s round up both David Fonnegra and Tina Kay Bohnstedt contributed works, along with revivals by Sally Streets and Nelson with a local premiere by Caniparoli.The program started, however, with Balanchine’s pas de deux from Apollo with Mayo Sugano as Terpsichore and Jenkins Pelaez as a warm and  gallant Apollo.  The raised platform arrangement at Shadowlands and the resulting low ceiling clearance did not lend much magic to this excerpt from Mr. B’s classical milestone, but the two dancers made the best of it.  Sugano must have enjoyed the opportunity which would have eluded her during her seasons with San Francisco Ballet.

The local premiere of Caniparoli’s Gustav’s Rooster to Hoven Droven’s music teamed Katherine Wells with Rory Hohenstein who has guested during the season.  The two were well-matched in size, physique and their ability to embrace quirky choreography deftly. One-time San Francisco Ballet soloist who joined Christopher Wheeldon’s short-lived ensemble Morphoses,  Hohenstein’s singular abilities with idiosyncratic choreography has been missed. One wants to see him join Wells more often.

Sally Streets’ Encore, created for the company in 1996 for two couples, was danced in memory of her son dancer Robert Nichols, who died this spring. Pelaez partnered Martyanova and Edward Stegge joined Sugano in this tribute.

David Fonnegra shared Tina Kay Bohnstedt’s take on “My Way” with Hohenstein, mericfully minus Frank Sinatra’s voice.  Bohnstedt. temporarily side-lined by surgery, gave the men large sweeping movements, body stretches and jumps to accent the rise and fall of the music.

Nelson’s Walk before Talk, premiered by the company in 1998, completed the program with Wells prominent at the beginning, followed by an energetic rendition by the entire troupe.

A discussion followed the performance with audience and dancers exchanging views and background information.  Caniparoli also was on hand to comment.

Diablo Ballet has recently been awarded a grant from The San Francisco Foundation to support its outreach program in the Contra Costa Public Schools.