Tag Archives: Dwight Rhoden

USA IBC’s Tenth Opening Ceremony, Thalia Mara Auditorium June 14, 2014

5 Jul

Opening Ceremonies are known for honorifics; USA IBC’s Tenth such was no exception; speeches, mercifully short preceded a handsome display of past and present to familiar music played by the Mississippi Symphony directed by Ramona Pansegrau.

The slightly yellow-hued printed pages named the event The Gertrude C. Ford Opening Ceremony. Ford was serious about the arts, a student of Shakepearean literature and an accomplished musician, and married to Aaron Lane Ford, an attorney and one time U.S. Congressman. Established in 1991, The Gertrude C. Ford Foundation’s focus is on education, health and youth services, 2008 assets listed as over $45 million. Support of music is a consistent theme; in the recent Thalia Mara Auditorium renovation, the orchestra pit bears Ford’s name.

Comments about the renovation are elsewhere, including the post-Ceremony reception.

This year a quartet from the Mississippi Chorus replaced the usual soprano soloist leading the Star Spangled Banner, sparing us the possibility of screeching at the high notes. The honors for the U.S. flag and Mississippi State were accomplished by the Germantown High School Marine Corps JROTC Color Guard, notable for the quartet’s varied size and serious demeanor.

Twenty-five year veteran Sue Lobrano’s opening remarks were followed by Tony Yarber, the handsome African-American Mayor of Jackson; short, congratulatory, welcoming. He was followed by Haley Fisackerly, Board Chair of the USA IBC and completed by 1982 Senior Gold Medalist Janie Parker, representing Luigi, the Tenth Competition’s Honorary Chairman. She stated her qualifications arose from classes in modern dance and jazz in Atlanta, Georgia prior to study at the North Carolina’s School of the Arts.

Down came the screen to run Celebrating 35 Years at the USA IBC. Edited by John Stockwell of Times Fly Productions, the audience was treated to glimpses of Thalia Mara teaching class, a brief second or two of Robert Joffrey, and a kaleidoscope of winners. The video warrants being attached to the USA IBC Web page.

Sir Edward Elgar’s Pomp and Circumstance #4 provided the background for the ninety some competitors to march down Thalia Mara’s left aisle, cross below the stage and step up, the first of any group or a single competitor bearing the flag of the country represented. Garbed in black sweats and hooded jackets courtesy of Capezio Ballet Makers, Inc., youth and its energy caught the throat, swelling the chest with near patriotic fervor, the pleasure of their massive presence.

Flags ranged behind them, the competitors stood as the Jurors and the Dance School Faculty were introduced to the strains of Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake. Included were the Competition’s Host and Hostess, Wes Chapman and Susan Jaffe. Finally, to Aaron Copland’s Fanfare for the Common Man, Joseph Phillips, USA IBC’s Junior Gold Medalist in 2002, strode with distinct measured stride down the same left aisle, climbed the stairs to lit the Competition Torch, raised back stage center. Everyone clapped and it was time for intermission.

Complexions, the New York City-based company of thirteen dancers, founded by Dwight Rhoden and Desmond Richardson in 1994, was the post intermission invited company, dancing a 2013 Rhoden choreography titled Innervisions, to a suite of Stevie Wonder songs, the work partially supported by the NEA and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, partnering with the City Council.

What a talented mix of dancers that Complexions presents demonstrating multi-culturalism at its best and most skilled! From all parts of the U.S. – Long Island, Atlanta, Philadelphia, Detroit, Los Angeles, Baltimore, Washington State, Ohio were represented; not surprisingly, a number of the locations have high schools emphasizing the arts. Cuba, Japan and Korea also contributed to the mix. Women whose thighs or height precluded membership in any company of note’s classical corps de ballet yielded nothing in technical brilliance, phrasing or presence, to their more willowy sister dancers. They plunged briefly into the arms of partners or in equally short sisterhoods to the over-miked voice of Wonder. As baseball rookies or contract players, the men’s walk and physique yielded nothing to those already in the game. The collective energy level spilled across the footlights as easily as simulated fog, but did not dissipate; it continued throughout the disparate choreography performed. There was no sonata allegro form in the dance witnessed and perhaps just one discernible ensemble phrase of any length. Virtually everyone commented on one small dancer performing downstage left whose ability to fall to the floor and raise himself with equal swiftness testified not only to a flexible spine but abdominal muscles of major flexibility; he was mesmerizing. Little wonder that, beyond the loose format, the audience gave Complexions a roaring ovation, standing.

Advertisements

Ballet San Jose’s Second 2014 Program, March15

7 Apr

From the neo-classical to Astor Piazolla as viewed by Paul Taylor, the Ballet San Jose dancers were thrust into a wide range of styles with the company’s second season series. And they did well by it, believe me. In between there was Nat King Cole interpreted by Dwight Rhoden and Vicente Nebrada’s 1976 perspective on romance.

Igal Perry set his bar high with using Ludwig Van Beethoven’s Adagio from the Hammerklavier Sonata for four couples, providing variations for each couple and ensemble work. Named em>Infinity, one signature motif, if you want to call it that, was the having the women supported in an expansive frontal a la seconde, not a jete, but held while they flexed their feet. With the sustained, somewhat prolonged finale to the Adagio, the necessity of repetitive movements was not only required, but was too predictable. Perry respected his music if the figures he devised for the dancers, once initially stated, needed slight variations to retain interest.

Dwight Rhoden’s 2013 Evermore for five couples added torso inflections, unexpected leg thrusts or inflections to fill the liquid, phrases of Cole’s lush renditions. Cole surrendered to the songs and emotions as much as he interpreted them; for me this full-bodied quality was diminished by the busy body motions. Think Twyla Tharp-Frank Sinatra, as possessing an edgier timbre. It seemed Rhoden was shy in echoing Cole’s grand simplicity.

With Nuestros Valses >to the music of Ramon Delgado Palacias and Terese Carreno, Vicente Nebrada provided his couples both variations and ensembles, flirtatious swoons and swooping waltz movements, evoking romance but giving the audience a feel for the Latin view of civilized romance.

Paul Taylor’s Piazolla Caldera found the dancers enjoying themselves, rising to the implicit torrid quality of tango at its sexiest and most suggestive, and leaving the audience exhilarated and enthusiastic.

Ballet San Jose Announces its 2013-2014 season

24 Aug

Ballet San Jose will start its 2013-2014 season with a November 16 Gala before proceeding to Karen Gabay’s Nutcracker December 13-26. 2014 will see three repertory programs starting February 13 and ending May 11 in this first season with Jose Manuel Carreno as artistic director, Raymond Rodriguez as Associate Artistic Director with George Daugherty as Music Director and Conductor.

Choreographers for the spring season will include Twyla Tharp, Paul Taylor, Ohad Naharin, Vicente Nebrada, Jorge Amarante, Igal Perry, Jorma Elo, and Dwight Rhoden. Their works will represent company premieres.

The Benefit Gala on November 16 reflects Carreno’s drawing power from his years with American Ballet Theatre, and his ability to attract fellow Cubans and
notable Spaniards to spice the occasion, beyond obvious guest contracts. The Gala roster will include from American Ballet Theatre: Julie Kent, Marcelo Gomes, Misty Copeland, Gillian Murphy. From New York City Ballet; Gonzalo Garcia, Joaquin de Luz, Daniel Ulbricht and Megan Fairchild. It is probably Garcia’s first area appearance since leaving San Francisco Ballet for New York City’s namesake company. Boston Ballet will be represented by Lorna Feijoo, Nelson Madrigal, Adiarys Almeida and Joseph Gatti. Topping the list will be Tamara Rojo, one time Royal Ballet principal and now Artistic Director and principal dancer with the English National Ballet. The artists will bring welcome glimpses since their companies have not appeared here recently.

Program I, February 14-16, 2014 will include George Balanchine’s Serenade, credited as 1949, probably in a current form; it was initially created in 1935 soon after Balanchine arrived in the United States. Jorma Elo’s 2006 work, Glo-Stop will be included with Ohad Naharin’s company premiere of his 1999 work, Minus 16. The theme of the program is Neoclassical to Now.

Popular Music, Transcendent Dancing is the title for Program 2, March 21-23.
The five works are company premieres and include Vicente Nebrada, 1975, Nuestros Valses; Argentine-born choreographer Jorge Amarante, 2007, Grapa Tango; Israeli Igal Perry, 2013, Infinity to Ludwig Van Beethoven’s Hammerklavier’s Adagio; Paul Taylor, 1997, Piazzolla Caldera, Astor Piazzola music. Dwight Rhoden, one time Alvin Ailey Company member now most noted as the artistic director of the Complexions ensemble, shares his 2013 Evermore to the music of Nat King Cole.

Two works will complete the third Program May 9-11 titled Masterworks of Movement and Theatre. They are the 1949 Roland Petit Carmen, in the company’s repertoire for some time, and Twyla Tharp’s 1986 ballet for American Ballet Theatre In the Upper Room to the music of Philip Glass.

Ballet San Jose will announce the company member roster in September.